Why are there multiple connectors for Icom earpieces

Without giving too much about this earpiece piece of writing, but I found it fascinating and significant to what I’m currently doing.

The four different Icom earpiece connectors connect the earpiece in question to four different types of two-way radio or, at least, four different types of connector.

Generally, it is good advice to make absolutely sure that your chosen earpiece can connect with the radio you intend to use. Not all radios use the same fittings, which is why there are so many different types of connector available.

A straight pin connector, for example, works best when used on marine radios, but is also compatible with Maxon and Vertex radios. Another thing to take into account is the activity that the earpiece is going to be used for. If the user is going to be standing still for prolonged periods of time, then he/she may require a different type to the one that may be preferable if the user is going to be engaging in strenuous exercise.

Two-way radios are used in a great many distinct environments, including shopping centers, building sites, roadway maintenance, fleet and transport operations, shipping, factory floor work, security, healthcare, private transport and much more besides. Because of this, there are many different types of earpiece connectors.

The four available Icom earpiece connectors indicate the jobs that the compatible two-way radios were likely designed for. This does not necessarily mean that an Icom radio would be unsuitable for other work, just that it is probably particularly suited to a certain type of job.

The different connectors also have distinct methods of working, even though their basic external operations are usually indistinguishable from one another. Icom have gone to great lengths to make their earpieces among the best in the world. One way they have done this is by allowing the earpiece connectors to be tailor made for specific tasks.

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How many times has it happened to you?

bluetooth your tvWhilst many of our visitors are excited about some of my own articles, here’s one i discovered whilst surfing around stumbleupon.com it’s far better written than I might ever dream to reach. Maybe someday I will get to their rank, you never know.

How many times has it happened to you that you have given a second quick look to a mobile, while on the move? Not a lot of times, for sure, it only happens when either a cell’s eye-catching cover has caught your interest or when a striking accessory hanging off a phone has awed you. Or perhaps an exclusive headset has made you think that having one of these is really a stylish choice. The point being talked about here is the cell accessories that not just put emphasis on the visuals of a phone, however also add to its performance. Of late, various accessories are offered in the market to go well with your diverse requirements.

Previously, mobile phones were utilized as basic gadgets to make as well as entertain calls and be connected, while on the move. However, with the passage of time and as machinery has advanced, this humble gadget got an innovative avatar and allowed its users to multitask. To multi task, we have to take good care of the cell and this can be rightly done by means of good components and accessories.

Let us know a bit about the most preferred mobile accessories:

Mobile phone batteries: It is important to always keep your mobile phone battery charged; even better if you always carry along an already charged battery with yourselves. This will help you to be connected even if your battery drains out. It is best to change your old mobile batteries after making use of it for one or two years, particularly if your battery meter shows instability.

Cell phone headsets: These accessories help you do whatever thing you want to do, be it shopping, driving, or eating, at the same time as talking with your friends and family on the mobile. Headsets come in various choices to go well with diverse needs. The handiest amongst all the headsets is mobile Bluetooth headset; this variety is without wires and keeps you connected in the most comfortable way.

Mobile screen-guard: This accessory helps you guard your mobile display from any harm, be it scratches, stains, or even cracks. These come in diverse sizes to go with diverse phones.

Mobile phone cases: Add quality to your phone with multi-colored and stylish covers. Nowadays you get a range of covers in diverse shapes, sizes, shades as well as designs. Cases are made of diverse materials, each having its individual distinctive advantage. Some of the various forms of cases are: flip, wallet, hard, slip cases etc.

The mobile cover not just guards the device, however also makes it look eye-catching.

Article Source: website Phone Accessories – Making Your Mobile More Useful As Well As Stylish

Police hearing loss: £135m paid in compensation

This article is posted with the faithful permission of earpiece.com, that is the original blog. please get consent from that blog before reposting this editorial.

Police have paid out more than £135m to settle claims by former officers who said their hearing was damaged during the course of their duties.

Almost half that bill, more than £65m, was for legal fees.
Details of payments have been revealed by the PSNI in response to a Freedom of Information request by Belfast-based victims group Relatives for Justice.
Up to the end of November, compensation was paid to 8,641 former officers, with hundreds of other claims pending.

As the only routinely armed police force in the UK, the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) officers had to undergo regular firearms training.
It has been established that since the late 1960s, police sources were aware of medical evidence that they had to provide sufficient ear protection for anyone involved in this kind of activity.
Firing ranges This is a legal principle referred to as the “date of knowledge”.
But the RUC did not provide “industry standard” ear protection for another three decades.

One former officer who received compensation spoke of his experience on firing ranges.
“Even when ear protection was introduced, it was sometimes of a very poor standard and there weren’t always enough sets of headphones to go around,” he said.
“If you were waiting for your turn on the range, it wasn’t uncommon to have to simply put your fingers in your ears when standing close to someone firing a gun.
“When we trained with the army, soldiers would shake their heads in amazement at our lack of proper equipment.”

More than 10,000 former RUC officers have lodged claims for damages, saying their hearing was damaged.
Enormous compensation The claims include officers who claim to have suffered hearing loss as a result of frequent radio use, while being transported in helicopters and while driving motorcycles.
However, the vast majority of claims are for damage caused during firearms training.
The figures involved in compensation are enormous.

In response to the Freedom of Information request from Relatives for Justice, the PSNI revealed that, up the end of November, the total amount paid out to settle cases was £135,357,689.
Of that total, £70,161,788 was damages paid to former officers, while £65,195,901 was for legal and court costs.
SDLP MLA Alban Maginness, a barrister and member of Stormont’s justice committee, said the legal costs were unacceptable and could have been greatly reduced.

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SDLP MLA Alban Maginness described the compensation figures as shocking
“I have raised this issue on a number of occasions,” he said.
“It is a shocking figure and the Policing Board and the Department of Justice have questions to answer about how this was allowed to happen.
‘Devastating’ “The police could have taken a much broader approach instead of contesting every case, when medical evidence had been provided stating that there had been hearing loss.

“That would have saved a substantial sum of money.”
Sinn F訮 MLA Pat Sheehan said the amount of money paid out to the former officers was unjustifiable.
“The amount of money, £135m, involved is extortionate. This is clearly unjustifiable and can not be stood over,” he said.
“These officers were well paid and this public money could have been used elsewhere.”
However, former detective superintendent Alan Mains, who received compensation for hearing loss while on duty, defended the pay-outs.

“Collectively speaking, it looks like a phenomenal sum. But it could have been dealt with a lot differently… if they had taken a broad common sense approach, instead of challenging medical evidence,” he said.
“The reason why we had to carry guns in the first place is pretty obvious – we were the only police service in all of the UK (to have to do so).”
Edwards and Company solicitors have settled claims for more than 3,000 officers, and another 500 are in the pipeline.

One of its senior partners said the affects of hearing loss could be devastating.
Dorcas Crawford cited the example of one client who suffered from a constant ringing sound in his ears, a condition known as tinnitus.
“His case was terribly severe, the worst I have heard of, so much so that when he went to see the hearing consultant, he asked him if he could possibly make him deaf because he would prefer to be deaf than to have to cope with the tinnitus,” she said.

“The sad fact, of course, is that the consultant couldn’t do that, and even if he was completely deaf he would still have the tinnitus, but it simply drove him insane.”
She also rejected any suggestion that former officers could make false claims.
“Hearing loss can be objectively measured,” she said.
Medical evidence “In every case settled by the Crown Solicitors Office, clients are tested and examined by two doctors, one acting for their solicitor and the other acting for the police, and medical reports are produced.

“Those medical reports then determine the extent of the compensation claim.”
While her company has benefited financially by representing officers with hearing loss claims, she agrees with Mr Maginness that the police could have significantly reduced the legal bill by accepting medical evidence instead of contesting every case.
“Virtually every single case, except for a tiny, tiny minority, are settled at door of court, so generally I really don’t see any reason why those could not have been settled once the medical evidence was on for both sides,” she said.

Mark Thompson’s organisation, Relatives for Justice, made the Freedom of Information request “I don’t for one minute suggest that the Crown simply pay out money where the case hasn’t been proven, but the case is proven at the earliest stage when they’ve got both medical reports.
“My estimate would be that they could have saved around half of that sum for legal costs by settling cases at an early stage.”
‘Unfair’ The group that sent the Freedom of Information request to the police described the sums of money involved as “appalling”.

Mark Thompson, director of Relatives for Justice, said it was unfair that so much has been spent paying the legal costs for former officers, at the same time as those taking action against the police and State were having their legal aid cut.
“We represent people who have been victims of the conflict and are trying to take action against the police and they are having their legal aid cut, and the lawyers that represent them have been condemned by some unionist politicians,” he said.

“But here we have the police spending tens of millions of pounds in damages to former police officers, and paying out tens of millions in legal costs and we don’t hear those politicians asking questions about it. That is simply unacceptable.”
In a statement, the PSNI said: “All hearing loss claims have to be thoroughly investigated.
“The chief constable is fully aware of his responsibility to the public purse and the strategy for handling hearing loss litigation has been kept under review by the Chief Constable’s lawyers and the Crown Solicitor’s Office with the aim of ensuring that claims are dealt with as economically as is possible given the technical aspects of the cases and the individual circumstances of each.”

The PSNI also said all legal costs were closely scrutinised and “have been challenged by the Chief Constable’s lawyers when appropriate”.

You’ll Never Work Alone, Radios and the Lone Worker

With very little information on the internet about radio earpiece’s, it is very rare when we get a chance to re post, with permission, an article from this industry.

earpiece bluetooth headsetIn accordance with the ‘Health and Safety at Work’ act of 1974, every UK-based employer is legally obliged to look out for their employees and not expose them to undue risks.

This is a good and noble law and one that has doubtless saved many lives since it was first passed almost 40 years ago. This law has also led to the development of many new technologies aimed at keeping workers safe…One tool that is completely indispensable to the lone worker is his or her two-way radio.

Today, many two-way radios come with a ‘Lone Worker’ function. This function sounds an alarm if the device has not been used within a set amount of time. Using this function, an employer can dispatch a worker into a potentially hazardous area, but still account for their safety to as great a degree as possible.

So, what sort of places might be hazardous to a lone worker? Workers who operate in and around chemical and manufacturing plants are a good example of lone workers who, using their two-way radios, can keep in constant, immediate contact with their control centre. Potential exposure to hazardous chemicals, dangerous machinery and so on can place these jobs in the ‘high risk’ category, making a walkie-talkie system a veritable necessity. After that, consider construction workers, taxi drivers and miners; people who need to be contactable every step of the way.

In addition to that, there are also security guards, policemen and bouncers to consider, all of whom risk running into potential violence, as well as scenarios that may require immediate assistance and/or rapid medical attention.

In recent years, there has been a steady growth in the amount of people operating as lone workers. Workforce reductions forced upon recession-hit businesses have caused some workers to operate alone, for example. However, there are also more care in the community groups (such as youth workers), late night deliveries being made, increased security/surveillance concerns and people taking on night work just to make ends meet. In order to keep these hard working professionals safe, companies are required to invest in the technology that can keep their workforce secure and looked after.

Two-way radios are durable, dependable and easy to operate. They are a proven and trusted technology and they save lives. These days, it would be positively unthinkable to send an employee into a potentially hazardous situation without first equipping them with the relevant safety gear and a two-way radio.

The Dead Actor’s Studio

Article of the Day………ok so i haven’t got a piece of writing each day, but if i get a chance I’ll post posts I find fascinating. Fortunate enough here’s one of these articles that I read and needed to share. Should you enjoy it as much as me, please add one of the special social media likes, you know the one that tells everyone you enjoyed something, rather then you sat on your arse and watched TV!

security 2013 virusImagine a young Marlon Brando starring alongside Johnny Depp, or Audrey Hepburn playing rival to Sandra Bullock as Marilyn Monroe stops by for a catty cameo.

Depending on how you look at it, this is either tantalizing ‘fantasy film making’ or else an utterly horrible, cash-in exercise in Hollywood excess. Whatever your viewpoint, it does seem likely that someone, somewhere will try this in the near future.

About three years ago, the news broke that George Lucas, the genius behind the ‘Star Wars’ merchandise (and a couple of related movies), was buying up the likeness rights to a plethora of iconic, yet deceased, leading men and famous actresses from Hollywood’s golden age. His plan? To use a concoction of existing footage, CGI and motion capture to create reasonable facsimiles of classic Hollywood stars and have them appear in future films, despite the notable handicap of being, well, dead.

Initially, it was just for one project, but it raised the prospect of other films being made, as well as a number of interesting philosophical issues.

The majority of critics reacted negatively to the notion of these ‘Franken-films’, some saying that the magic of an individual acting performance would be notably absent in the films, others upset that the actors themselves could potentially ‘star’ in projects that they may not have supported in life.

It really must be said, however, that blockbuster movies like 2009’s ‘Avatar’ and 2011’s ‘Rise of the Planet of the Apes’ already received plaudits for their use of motion capture techniques and CGI ‘acting’. It is an accepted part of modern cinema, like it or not.

Lest we forget, George Lucas’ own ‘Star Wars’ films also featured a number of purely CG characters. In our era, we are becoming very used to CG characters; even CG versions of real actors are commonplace. It really isn’t a huge leap of imagination (or available technology) to foresee deceased stars headlining blockbusters once again.

We are also living in a world that specializes in the glorification of deceased idols and recycled imagery (take a look at this month’s music magazines and count how many times you see Jimi Hendrix, Kurt Cobain or other dead stars on the covers). Look at the movie magazines as they feature young DeNiro as Travis Bickle, or Ray Liotta as Henry Hill. We, as consumers, are being conditioned to expect our stars to be able to do anything we can imagine, including coming back from the dead.

Why we want it:

The question here, to at least some degree, is ‘do we want it?’ but for now, I’m going to be positive and assume that we do…

Bringing classic actors back to ‘life’ would be a daring and controversial decision and would inspire all kinds of debates. It would also, no doubt, stimulate the film industry by providing literally hundreds of thousands of new prospects, pairings and casting choices.

On the downside, it would probably create an updated version of the old Hollywood studio system that would likely prove to be a legal nightmare involving no small amount of heartache for the families of the stars being featured. It could also have the negative effect of holding down upcoming talent.

However, many Hollywood actors do what they do for a shot at immortality and this is, frankly, the closest that they are likely to get to that goal. It would not surprise me at all if ‘likeness rights’ contracts started containing an ‘after death’ clause that specified use of the actor’s image in posthumous film projects.

Culturally speaking, in a world where dead musicians like Hendrix and 2Pac routinely release albums and where popular music is dominated by the ‘sampling’ (and in some cases, outright theft) of other works, or where film texts constantly, almost obsessive-compulsively, reference each other (in what has become the intertextual equivalent of an M.C Escher drawing), rehashing the stars of the past seems like an obvious choice.

Dead icons could spice up Hollywood by adding controversy, class and bankability to the summer’s contrived blockbuster selection. Plus, all their skeletons, secrets and shameful actions are already a matter of public record, so there’s no ill-timed revelatory ‘gossip’ that’s going to rear up and threaten the production.

Even those who oppose the making of such movies will still have to watch them in order to write the requisite bad reviews, this simply proves the old adage that controversy generates cash.

When can we expect it?

Oh snap, it already happened. In the year 2000, actor Oliver Reed sadly died during the filming of Ridley Scott’s ‘Gladiator’. In order for him to finish what would become his final role, the VFX team created a CG ‘mask’ of Reed’s face and used a body double to complete their film.

Remember that car advert with Steve McQueen? It has already begun.

Real, workable CGI stars are already a reality, but the technology does not yet exist to create a completely CG James Dean for a sequel to ‘Rebel Without a Cause’. I’d give it maybe 10-20 years before we start seeing the stars in respectful, tasteful cameo roles, or else old actors performing alongside their younger selves. After that, it’ll be 3-5 years before we see the screen idols like Errol Flynn, Clark Gable and Grace Kelly headlining movies again.

Cool factor 3/5 – It really depends on how these ‘stars’ are handled. The results could, potentially, be beautiful codas to a star’s career (which is how they could be sold to the audience), but they could also be horribly insulting, denigrating the work of great actors and actresses. Time is going to tell, as usual…

Reasons your business should use two way radios

So i found this post on the internet and i heard that just posting it as the whole article is not a good thing, I got consent from the original writer and read up the way to curate articles, so that is it…….i thought this was interesting because it highlights some of the highs and lows that I encountered when i was working in the business.

Easy to use, rugged and affordable. In the competitive construction and manufacturing field, improving productivity and controlling costs has never been more important. Motorola and Kenwood business two-way radios provide clear communication – often in noisy environments – and that’s essential to avoiding downtime, accelerating job progress and enabling faster response.

Instant communication in Construction means: Improved jobsite coordination, Reduced operational costs, Faster delivery and material coordination, Smoother work crew scheduling, Quick coordination and response to emergencies, Enhanced safety and security, Immediate production updates, Increased customer service and satisfaction and Reduced monthly operating costs.

Some of the reason businesses purchase two way radios is worker safety and liability issues, pressure to finish projects faster, profit margins are thin, getting more done with fewer workers, workers carry many tools on the job, workers can coordinate and quickly respond to accidents, or emergencies, maintain constant contact with and among workers to help, mobilize them and get tasks completed faster, affordable walkie talkie radios help make workers more productive and accountable. Leaner work crews stay focused on the job at hand and keep projects moving. Durable, lightweight and easy to use, the walkie talkie radios clip right on the tool belt.

On-Site Two-Way Business Radios uphold that superior standard. Each radio and radio accessory is backed by a limited one-year warranty on parts and labor. So when you select the walkie talkie, you’ll experience the same exceptional quality you’ve come to expect from all Motorola and Kenwood products. Some even have a two year warranty. See the manufacturer for details.

Two-Way Business Radios are a powerful combination of exceptional audio quality and excellent durability. Discover what many managers already know — Motorola two-way business radios offer you a powerful tool for enhancing employee productivity and overall customer satisfaction. Now, through the enhanced technology you get performance that you can leverage in your company or facility.

Rugged and Water Resistant are ways to describe most Business Two Way Radios. Durable metal die cast chassis helps radios hold up under demanding conditions. These 2 way radios meets Military 810 C, D, E, F and IP54/55 specifications for shock, rain, humidity, salt fog, vibration, sand, dust, temperature shock, and high and low temperatures. The IP54/55 tests include subjecting the radio to a high-speed, high-volume shower from all directions for three minutes.

Two-way radios offer the range and features that can help you increase productivity and efficiency, enhance security, and improve overall operation or customer service—all at the push of a button. Making sure your 2way radios are charged and ready to go is effortless too. Multi-unit and single drop-in chargers keep radios charged, ready, and centrally located. And the rechargeable lithium ion battery provides long battery life.

Improving efficiency and productivity – from department stores to large hotels, from restaurants to campuses, it’s why more businesses and schools use Motorola and Kenwood business two-way radios. They’re convenient, economical and the key to ensuring a streamlined process and enhanced customer service in retail, restaurant and hospitality establishments. Let’s not forget the manufacturing and construction industry. These 2-ways are long lasting and durable.

Narrow-banding is in effect On January 1, 2013, all public safety and business industrial land mobile radio systems operating in the 150-512 MHz radio bands must cease operating using 25 kHz efficiency technology, and begin operating using at least 12.5 kHz efficiency technology. This deadline is the result of an FCC effort that began almost two decades ago to ensure more efficient use of the spectrum and greater spectrum access for public safety and non-public safety users. Migration to 12.5 kHz efficiency technology (once referred to as Re-farming but now referred to as Narrowbanding) will allow the creation of additional channel capacity within the same radio spectrum, and support more users. As of January 1, 2011, the Commission no longer accepts applications for new wide-band 25 kHz operations, or modification of existing wideband 25 kHz stations that expand the authorized interference contour.

After January 1, 2013, licensees not operating at 12.5 kHz efficiency will be in violation of the Commission’s rules and could be subject to FCC enforcement action, which may include admonishment, monetary fines, or loss of license. source: http://www.motorola.com http://www.fcc.gov http://www.kenwoodusa.com

JBL Synchros S100i

So to resume my run of content pieces on this website, Ive decided to share one of my favourite posts this week. I used to be hesitant to include it to a website because I really didn’t wish to offend the original writer, but I hope he/she is happy that I loved reading their article and planned to share it with my readers.

It’s hard for earphones to stand out in the $100 price range, but the JBL S100 does a laudable job and should grab the attention of any big bass fan seeking affordable in-canal earphones. At $99.95 (direct), the sensibly priced S100 doesn’t distort on deep bass tracks and brings some serious low frequency thunder to the mix. JBL offers two S100 optionsthe S100i (with a remote optimized for iOS devices) and the S100a (with a remote optimized for Android devices). Both models are $99.95. The S100 won’t appeal to purists, but bass lovers seeking subwoofer-like lows with (some) balance in the high-mids and highs should read on.

This review is based on the JBL S100a, the Android version of the headphones. Besides a slightly different in-line remote, the S100i is effectively identical.

Visually, there’s not much about the S100$99.99 at Best Buy that will knock your socks off. It’s only offered in white or black for both the Android and iOS versions, and the earpieces are simple and nondescript, with just the JBL logo to catch your eye. Each earpiece connects to a flat cord, with the inline remote control and mic just below chin level along the left ear’s cable.

There aren’t too many accessories, but each inclusion is sensible and useful. The S100 comes with three silicone eartip pairs in different sizes, one Comply foam eartip pair, a shirt clip, and a zip-up protective pouch. The Comply eartips will offer the most stable fit, but the silicone eartips are also comfortable and secure; they just block out less ambient noise than the Comply eartips do.

On tracks with powerful sub-bass content, like the Knife’s “Silent Shout,” the S100 delivers some serious low-end rumble without distorting even at top (and unsafe) listening levels. At more moderate volumes, the S100 still brings more booming low end than a flat response pair would, but not so much that it’s unlistenable or woefully off-balance. Bass lovers will enjoy the S100 because it brings serious rumble, but doesn’t completely ignore the high-mids and highs necessary to keep the sound from getting muddy.

JBL S100a inlineThat said, if balance is your top priority, you’ll probably find the S100 is weighted a bit too much in favor of the lows. On Bill Callahan’s “Drover,” his baritone vocals get a lot more added richness than they probably need. There’s still plenty of treble edge there to keep a sense of clarity, providing his vocals with a decent high-mid presence and allowing the guitar strums not to get lost, but the mix seems a bit too weighted towards the lows for anyone seeking an accurate listening experience.

On Jay-Z and Kanye West’s “No Church in the Wild,” the big bass is on full display. The deep bass synth hits on this track are delivered with subwoofer-like gusto. The attack of the kick drum loop could use more definition in the high-mids to help it slice through the mix, however, and even though it’s never a problem to hear the various vocals on this track over the dense mix, a bit more high-mid and high presence would have balanced out the ominous bass presence.

Classical tracks, like John Adams’ “The Chairman Dances,” actually sound pretty exciting through the S100. It’s not a sound purists will gravitate towards, but the higher register strings hold their own in the mix quite wellpartially because classical recordings naturally favor the mids and the highs and often lack much in the way of low-end thunder. Here, however, the S100 adds some power to the lower register strings and percussion. The balance is more favorable here than on pop tracks that already have plenty of low-end to work with, and it’s a sound that many listeners will enjoy.

If you prefer more balance in your earphones, you have plenty of options in this general price range. Consider the TDK EB95022.49 at Amazon or the Jay t-Jays Three. If you want to spend less money but still want booming low-end in your mix, the SOL Republic Relays$79.99 at Verizon Wireless are a solid option, and the RHA MA15010.95 at Amazon is a truly inexpensive, decent-sounding pair. For $100, however, the JBL S100 offers a bass lover’s mix that doesn’t overpower, and a thoughtful array of accessories. This price range has several winners, but for lovers of deep low-end, the JBL S100 is an option worth considering.